Women of Color, in Solidarity

Because we're tired of the bullshit, and needed a space just for us.

  • 19th April
    2014
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Black lesbian relationships pose little threat to “self-defined” Black men and women secure in their sexualities. But loving relationships among Black women do pose a tremendous threat to systems of intersecting oppressions. How dare these women love one another in a context that deems Black women as a collectivity so unlovable and devalued?
Patricia Hill Collins (Black Feminist Thought: Black Women’s Love Relationships, 182)

(Source: daughterofzami)

  • 18th April
    2014
  • 18
how do you/your followers feel about those texts posts of random phrases that go around in asian languages (mainly Korean, Japanese, and Chinese Mandarin)? they have an orientalist feel to me, especially since the majority of the ones I've seen are simply translations of english idioms/metaphors.

Asked by: devsdemona

how ya’ll feel?????

  • 18th April
    2014
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  • 18th April
    2014
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The sexualisation of Indigenous women has been and continues today to one of the means by which white males exercise their control and reinforce their white privileged position in Australian society. The black female body has been represented in the West as an icon of sexual deviance since the 18th century. White men sexualised Australian society by inscribing onto Indigenous women’s bodies a narrative of sexualisation separated from whiteness.


Indigenous women’s presence in predominately white social domains is often consciously or unconsciously interpreted by white men as signalling sexual availability. Although white women may be propositioned in the same space, their whiteness means that they will not be approached as often and a rebuff is likely to be interpreted as an insult to the male’s ego rather than as a challenge to the white patriarchal supremacy

Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Talkin’ Up to the White Woman. University of Queensland Press, Brisbane, 2000.

(Source: insufficientmind)

  • 18th April
    2014
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  • 18th April
    2014
  • 18
Whole Foods is a point of entry into a new version of American whiteness, one which leans on a pseudo recognition of diversity through sanitized food presentation. It offers a new order of “otherness” in which the other is a pleasant-looking piece of food, totally safe, and with a pedigree. Within the Whole Foods’ bubble we are turned instantly sophisticated, and the store becomes the place where we can self-indulge in notions of cosmopolitan openness to world products and political struggles. To buy an avocado “with a background” ends up, dangerously, filling the space of our urge for political awareness. The store did the math for us, as well as all the thinking, so we can “shop with confidence” and just relax.

The whole process does something rather particular: It creates the illusion of an “independent” understanding within the larger implications of corporate intervention in defining a food’s background. In establishing a perimeter of commercial values based on social responsibility, Whole Foods depoliticizes us. Worse, for those already sinking into the hybrid life of a world without politics, it offers a parachute, a sort of immunity: “I shop here so, by extension, I know a thing or two about social awareness.”

Whole Foods unavoidably widens the gap between people who have everything and people who have nothing: How can super expensive foods that look like an invention of Edward Weston’s camera - that the majority of the world cannot afford, or would laugh about - be synonymous with social responsibility? This is truly a modern enigma.

The recent situation with quinoa, the “hot” and “trendy” new grain that we are suddenly unable to live without - and without which we are suddenly missing essential nutrients to keep us alive - is case in point. Paola Flores, filing for the AP from La Paz, Bolivia, reports that “[t]he scramble to grow more (quinoa) is prompting Bolivian farmers to abandon traditional land management practices, endangering the fragile ecosystem of the arid highlands, agronomists say.” A quinoa emergency, then, at the bulk bins. A separate exposé published in the Guardian goes even further: “[T]here is an unpalatable truth to face for those of us with a bag of quinoa in the larder. The appetite of countries such as ours for this grain has pushed up prices to such an extent that poorer people in Peru and Bolivia, for whom it was once a nourishing staple food, can no longer afford to eat it. Imported junk food is cheaper. In Lima, quinoa now costs more than chicken.” Whether we blame vegans or hipsters or the organic food movement or a lack of appropriate trade regulations, the troubling truth about quinoa represents that repetitive drama between the West and rest in which our voracious consumption depletes yet another land and another people.

Whole Foods widens the gaps, and it does so in the most subtle and displacing manner, giving us an environment (the actually sanitized, spotless physical space) that is the embodiment of an elite (yet perceived as “open,” especially through the chain’s less pricey “360” product line) that finds itself at home within a soulless, sterilized experiences. The notion of gentrification has been surpassed, attaining the space of a perennial state of mind. This is where even an apple turns into an object/jewelry of desire, not of need, or at least of normality. In that sense, Whole Foods is simply the last piece in the long, familiar chain of shifting perceptions in neo-capitalistic societies that exploded after the Second World War, in which the creation and multiplication of desires is central to the self-preservation of the system.

"Shipwrecked in Whole Foods"

- neoliberal notions of “you are what you consume”

- consumptive whiteness- the notion of the sophisticated white, western consumer

(via sextus—empiricus)

  • 18th April
    2014
  • 18

why you don’t see a lot of “nice” SJ bloggers:

theroguefeminist:

  1. people take advantage of your niceness to exploit you as a “source” of information - bombarding you with questions/requests with no respect for your boundaries/limitations
  2. give you backhanded compliments on your niceness at the expense of less nice “unreasonable” feminists/activists/others in your group
  3. use your nice statements as arguments against less nice activists/ people in your group or to excuse/justify oppressive behavior
  4. take your niceness as an invitation to enter your space even if they have a bigoted mindset because they find your space comfortable/safe (making it less safe for you)
  5. use your niceness as the basis for creating a false “middle ground” on issues of oppression and/or painting oppressive behaviors as mere mistakes or as a “gray area”
  6. the things we are upset about or denounce are usually upheld and praised and we are working to counteract those messages and create spaces where those things are unacceptable/not upheld as ideal
  7. lastly, niceness in the oppressed is usually defined by the privileged as being docile/acquiescent- basically being complicit in or enabling oppression and activists are by definition not these things. see [x]
  • 18th April
    2014
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  • 18th April
    2014
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  • 18th April
    2014
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  • 18th April
    2014
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5centsapound:

Zanele Muholi: Of Love & Loss (2014) - Currently showing at Stevenson Gallery in Johannesberg (South Africa) from 14 February - 4 April 2014.

The opening coincides with the presentation of a prestigious Prince Claus Award to Muholi.

Gallery Statement:

In times of increasingly homophobic legislation enacted by African countries and in a climate of intolerance towards homosexuals in the Western world, South Africa distinguishes itself with a Constitution that recognises same-sex marriages; yet the black LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) community is plagued by hate crimes. Black lesbians are particularly vulnerable and are regularly victims of brutal murders and ‘curatives rapes’ at the hand of neighbours or ‘friends’.

Since 2013 Muholi has been documenting weddings and funerals in the black LGBTI community in South Africa, joyful and painful events that often seem to go hand in hand. The show features photographs, video works and an installation highlighting how manifestations of sorrow and celebration bear similarities and are occasions to underline the need for a safe space to express individual identities.

As Muholi writes:

Ayanda Magoloza and Nhlanhla Moremi’s wedding in Katlehong took place four months after Duduzile Zozo was murdered in Thokoza. Promise Meyer and Gift Sammone’s wedding in Daveyton took place on 22 December in Daveyton, 15 days after Maleshwane Radebe was buried in Ratanda. Six months earlier, Ziningi and Delisile Ndlela were married in Chesterville, Durban. Many in the area attended the ceremony, blessed the newlywed couple and prayed for them and their children. We long for such blessings as we continue to read about the trials and tribulations that LGBTI persons experience in their churches, where homosexuality is persecuted. In 2014, when South African democracy celebrates its 20 years, it seems more important than ever to raise again our voice against hate crimes and discriminations made towards the LGBTI community.

The exhibition includes also a series of autobiographical images, intimate portraits of Muholi and her partner taken during their travels, a tender counterpoint to the tension still generated in South Africa today by same-sex and interracial relationships.

see her past work here.

  • 18th April
    2014
  • 18
asbehsam:

asbehsam:

SIGNAL BOOST, EVERYONE:
Save Satinah Ahmad from execution in Saudi Arabia
When Satinah’s employer tried to smash her head into a wall after months of alleged abuse, Satinah defended herself with a rolling pin.
The 41 year-old foreign domestic worker now faces execution in Saudi Arabia as early as tomorrow.
Call on the King of Saudi Arabia to spare Satinah’s life> http://ow.ly/vjJvQ
It takes one minute guys. JUST ONE MINUTE.

ONLY 1.510 OUT OF 50.000 IS LEFT, COME ON GUYS!

signal boost!!!!!

asbehsam:

asbehsam:

SIGNAL BOOST, EVERYONE:

Save Satinah Ahmad from execution in Saudi Arabia

When Satinah’s employer tried to smash her head into a wall after months of alleged abuse, Satinah defended herself with a rolling pin.

The 41 year-old foreign domestic worker now faces execution in Saudi Arabia as early as tomorrow.

Call on the King of Saudi Arabia to spare Satinah’s life> http://ow.ly/vjJvQ

It takes one minute guys. JUST ONE MINUTE.

ONLY 1.510 OUT OF 50.000 IS LEFT, COME ON GUYS!

signal boost!!!!!

  • 18th April
    2014
  • 18
  • 18th April
    2014
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  • 18th April
    2014
  • 18
Sure, movements can be healing. But are they? Many, many broke folks, parents and/or disabled folks who have been forced out of movements would say no. What disability justice and healing justice talks about—and asks—is, are they really? Or are they set up in burnout models that destroy folks’s physical and spiritual health? And I think that a big part of what movements that I’m part of do to *make movements* that aren’t shitty, is to center disabled, working-class and poor, parenting, and femme of color genius. Burnout isn’t just about not having a deep enough analysis. It’s about movements that are deeply ableist and inaccessible.
Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, “for badass disability justice, working-class and poor lead models of sustainable hustling for liberation” (via ethiopienne)