Women of Color, in Solidarity

Because we're tired of the bullshit, and needed a space just for us.

  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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seraphica:

Kim Kelley-Wagner has two daughters who were adopted from China. In everyday life, they have been subjected to horrid statements from people - to their faces, to their mother as they stood by her, etc. In this photo collection, shared on her blog, Kim and her daughters (Lily and Meika) put these ignorant cruelties front and center. [x]

"I have tried to explain to my daughters that people do not say these things to be mean, they say them out of ignorance, which is why I am sharing some of them. Words are powerful, they can become tools or weapons, choose to use them wisely."

  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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ethiopienne:

Eid Mubarak to all the Ethiopian Muslims who made it through another Ramadan in a nation state that criminalizes their existence and actively seeks to tarnish their holy month with its violence, to all the Eritrean Muslims whose bodies suffer the consequences of the USA’s inhumane sanctions against a government whose corruption is not their fault, to all the Somali Muslims whose prayers are sometimes drowned out by drone strikes.

  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 27th July
    2014
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art21:

"There’s no diploma in the world that declares you as an artist—it’s not like becoming a doctor. You can declare yourself an artist and then figure out how to be an artist." —Kara Walker

In a new episode from the ART21 Exclusive series, artist Kara Walker reflects on her early success and offers advice to the next generation of artists, shown again recent work at Sikkema Jenkins & Co. and the 2014 Frieze Art Fair.

WATCH: Kara Walker: Starting Out

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 Exclusive episode, Kara Walker: Starting Out. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

  • 27th July
    2014
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Discussion #8: Intersectionality and Disability | Disability in Kidlit

disabilityinkidlit:

For our first anniversary, we’re bringing back the discussion post format! In these posts, we ask our contributors for their thoughts on various topics. We’ll post one every Friday this month. Today, we asked:

Why is it that diversity in young adult, middle grade, and children’s literature is often represented as an either/or, without intersectionality? Characters can either be autistic or gay, for example, or a wheelchair user or Black, but rarely both. Why do you think we see so few characters who are marginalized in more than one way?

Snippets of their responses:

Marieke Nijkamp: And if you feel characters have to have a reason to be multi-dimensional, multi-diverse? I’d love to see an equally legitimate reason for characters to be white AND straight AND able-bodied AND middle class AND AND AND.

S. Jae-Jones: In my opinion, it all comes back to this mainstream idea of a “default”. The “default” is relatable. Stray too far from it, and it won’t sell.

Corinne Duyvis: It’s such a multi-faceted problem: first there’s the fact that most people don’t even see the need for these characters–as though people like me aren’t just as real and valid as the cishet-white-abled people who are often written about, and as though we don’t need representation just as much or more. 

s.e. smith: The fact is that many people have intersectional identities. Minority teens rarely get to see themselves in text at all, and those who experience multiple oppressions find it even harder to locate books that tell their stories.

Natalie Monroe: I personally think it’s because writers believe once a diverse element is added (ex: queer, ethnicity…), it’s done. Their book is now ‘diverse’ and ‘realistic’. But real life isn’t just one ball in a column, it’s a whole jumble of multicolored spheres across rows of columns.

[read the full answers—and several other people’s responses—here!]

Please add our own advice in a reblog or in the comments!

  • 27th July
    2014
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  • 27th July
    2014
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Follow and Submit to APIART Tumblog

angryasiangirlsunited:

Hello, I was hoping you could share my new blog I am trying to work on and grow.  It is based on API art, art by API artists, and many people of color artists who may not identify as API, through a social justice lens.  APIART takes into consideration that all art is political and that unifying multiple API artist on one blog will work to empower others to express themselves.  I hope you’ll share this so that others may follow and submit to the blog, especially with the thought that I won’t be able to curate this on my own! :)

  • 27th July
    2014
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Hi! I was wondering if you or your followers have any suggestions for good novels that feature non-white protagonists and main characters, taking place in any country, culture, or time period. I just finished one about a woman in Afghanistan, and I'm currently reading one about a Chinese immigrant and another about a young girl in Iran. I am having trouble finding more diversity at the library. Do you guys have any suggestions, resources, or links to a master post that could help me? Thanks!

Asked by: littlewoosh

image

These are the books I read over the month of July! :) 

I waited to answer this one because we had answered a similar ask like the day before we got this one. I’m just gonna repeat again - there are TONS, millions, of books written by People of Color out there, so answering an ask like this is really hard because we’d be listing stuff forever. 

I also wanted to be cool and show off the books I read because it seems like a thing people do (also taking public transportation to job interviews all summer has its perks lol so much reading time!) I’m just gonna give a sentence or two about each book below, from left to right. I tried not to put in spoilers (most of the summary info can be found on the backs of these books):

Redefining Realness byJanet Mock (memoir) is Janet’s personal story about growing up as a Black trans girl. The book covers her childhood and young adulthood, and she shares so many of her experiences with family, environment, self love, and survival. 

!Yo! by Julia Alvarez (fiction) is about Yolanda García, a Dominican writer who is a bestseller. The book is written in the POV of her family, friends, mentors, etc., and all tell stories about Yo in different periods of her life. It’s like a follow-up to How the García Girls Lost Their Accents but can be read by itself.

Seed to Harvest by Octavia Butler (aka the Patternist series) (science fiction). My copy had four of the novels in the series, placed in chronological order of the universe: Wild Seed, Mind of My Mind, Clay’s Ark, and Patternmaster (there was a fifth, but Octavia hated it so much she refused to have it reprinted). This series basically follows the narratives and history of what humanity becomes (two warring races, one of which has telepathic powers and the other which are a hybrid of human-alien beings) and how it happens. Almost all of the central characters are Black. 

Ash by Malinda Lo (fantasy) is a retelling of the Cinderella fairy tale. Ash, the main character, is basically split between the fairy world and her reality, forced to be a servant to her stepmother. She ends up falling in love with the King’s Huntress, and she has to make all these choices about what she wants vs. her duties/promises she’s made.

Huntress by Malinda Lo (fantasy) is in the same universe as Ash, but takes place centuries before. These two girls (Kaede and Taisin) have to go on a journey with the prince to the Fairy Queen’s land to figure out why their own world is dying. They have this massive adventure and also fall in love with each other. Lo has also said that the world is inspired by Chinese and Japanese folklore. 

Followers, read anything good lately?

- Jennifer 

  • 27th July
    2014
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  • 27th July
    2014
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Help Support Kadesha Bryan in Pre-Med!

My wonderful friend Kadesha has recently graduated high school and is now in the process of enrolling in Hunter College for pre-med, but unfortunately she currently does not have financial support as her family back in Jamaica are unemployed. If any of you could help out a fellow WoC or help spread the word, that would be great! She’s such an amazing young woman and I want nothing more than to see her succeed.