Women of Color, in Solidarity

Because we're tired of the bullshit, and needed a space just for us.

  • 1st September
    2014
  • 01

The two wolves and the grandfather legend

this-is-not-native:

I know in one of your previous posts you mentioned that the two wolf story the “very wise Native American grandfather” tells his grandchild is not actually Native. I really hate the wise-Native-American-animals trope and I don’t believe it’s an actual story originating from Native American culture. But I haven’t been able to find any sources that back me up. The Cherokee website actually quotes the story. Can you help me find some sources about its origins?

Don’t be fooled that’s not a Cherokee website

These are Cherokee Websites:

Second, here’s material showing unequivocally that it is in fact not from our culture, and here’s a caveat regarding “Indian Legends” you find on the internet

(via angrynativefeminists)

  • 1st September
    2014
  • 01
Pumpkin Online Aims to Include Everyone, Everywhere | Indie Game Magazine

a-spoon-is-born:

shwetanarayan:

zeekubeast:

wigglyflippingout:

ladynorbert:

Okay, Tumblr, let’s make this go viral. You all know that representation in the media is desperately needed, and this game is delivering what many of the big-name games haven’t. Pumpkin Online is made by a development team headed by an African-American woman and they’re aiming to make this game as inclusive and friendly as possible. This is a farming/romance sim mixed up with an adventure MMORPG and made incredibly diverse.

You want to play a non-binary character? You got it! You want a range of races in your NPC neighbors? Done! Clothing choices and body features not restricted by gender? It’s in there! Relationships in no way affected by gender or lack of gender? Yes, that too!

Let’s get this thing going viral and help promote the Kickstarter (link in the article) so that everyone gets the chance to play the character they want to play. Reblog buttons, do your thing!

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO YOU GUYYYYSSSSSSSSSSSS

reblogging this again with a link to their Kickstarter here

I WANT THIS SO MUCH

This looks pretty cool:

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  • 1st September
    2014
  • 01
stankface:

brotherswinchesthair:

softurl:

fluffmugger:

oh look. She’s white.

#if something could function very well as nazi propaganda (even if it’s not) don’t believe it

they’re talking proportionality though, not actually saying she’s the most gorgeous being on the planet. Like idk what to tell you.

As if common POC features such as: eyes that are “too small”, lips that are “too big”, faces that are “too oblong”, noses that are “too wide” or “too long” etc. etc. don’t fit into the category of disproportionate…
As if what is considered proportionally acceptable isn’t heavily leaning in the European direction…

!

stankface:

brotherswinchesthair:

softurl:

fluffmugger:

oh look. She’s white.

they’re talking proportionality though, not actually saying she’s the most gorgeous being on the planet. Like idk what to tell you.

As if common POC features such as: eyes that are “too small”, lips that are “too big”, faces that are “too oblong”, noses that are “too wide” or “too long” etc. etc. don’t fit into the category of disproportionate…

As if what is considered proportionally acceptable isn’t heavily leaning in the European direction…

!

(Source: funniestpicever)

  • 1st September
    2014
  • 01
  • 1st September
    2014
  • 01
  • 1st September
    2014
  • 01
  • 31st August
    2014
  • 31
  • 31st August
    2014
  • 31

First pages of Asian Women (1971), a journal produced by students at UC Berkeley, with articles and art submitted by Asian women across the country.

Most of the compilers met in Asian Studies 170, a winter 1971 proseminar designed to discuss the history and roles of Asian women. Confronted with sexism in the Asian movement, and finding that “the white middle-class woman’s liberation movement” was not relevant to their lives, many Asian American women activists in colleges found the need to create venues for their experiences and opinions.

(Source: asianamericanactivism, via asianwomenbodyrainbow)

  • 30th August
    2014
  • 30

…“Most of the rapes that northern soldiers committed were of black women,” and Murphy writes that “most states had laws stating that no crime of rape against slave women existed,” leaving them even less recourse to seek justice…..

Even if it was an upper-class white woman, who was more likely to believed, sometimes judges would dismiss it because they would feel, “Oh, [if she were really a lady] she would have been too ashamed to actually come forward.” So everything was stacked against the woman.

That’s the other thing: both the North and the South rarely thought it was rape when it was a black woman. It wasn’t until the Civil War when black women were actually able to come forward and call it rape. Before that time, even in the North, they would make it a lesser charge [for black women], if at all. I do have at least one record where a black woman was able to testify about a sexual assault in New York or someplace like that, but that was very rare. For the most part, black women’s voices went unheard…

-from, 

Gender, Race, and Rape During the Civil War

Slavery, the value of chastity, and laws that favored men all made it difficult for women to find justice during the chaos of war.

(Source: diasporadash)

  • 30th August
    2014
  • 30
  • 29th August
    2014
  • 29

Call for Submissions

Hi Motherlands is looking for artists and writers for issue one and so would be grateful if you could share it. As well as British artists of colour, there will be an entire section of the zine devoted to international artists so if you have something you’d like to share please get in touch!

  • 29th August
    2014
  • 29
  • 29th August
    2014
  • 29
  • 29th August
    2014
  • 29

Mod application for RTNT (reclaimingthenativetag)

reclaimingthenativetag:

Name:
Age:
Gender and pronouns you use:
Any disabilities?:
What is your nation? (If you’re mixed, tell me about that too!):
Why do you want to be a mod for RTNT?:
Anything else you feel I should know about? Tell me a little about yourself! (interests, hobbies, where you grew up (on/off a rez?), experiences with racism, etc.):

As a mod, you will help answer asks and submissions, reblog relevant content to Native peoples or content that may help others (such as signal boosting and resources,) and generate discussions when you can. You should tag things for organization and/or for the security of others. (I am currently in the process of organizing posts and tagging them appropriately.)


I am accepting applications until September 10th. Please send me an application as a TEXT SUBMISSION. (Not through an ask or fanmail!)


Please be aware about your privileges (such as being light skinned, cis, able-bodied, etc.) and issues such as ableism, classism, misogyny, transmisogyny/transphobia, homo/biphobia, anti-Blackness, etc. Always work on bettering yourself! If you are continuously called out on something problematic you did and you are not willing to apologize for your mistakes, it will result in suspension or being banned from the blog.

Signal boost! NOTE: all submissions go to Reclaiming the Native Tag, not to us :)

  • 28th August
    2014
  • 28
womenpacific:

juliosalgado83:

I was lucky go catch Terisa Siagatonu throw it down with this beautiful poem on Saturday at Jean Melesaine’s Navigating Queer Waves show at Galería de la Raza I love how these badass poets of color are queerifying the world one poem at a time!
NOTE: This is only part of the poem. 

“Terisa Tinei Siagatonu is a 1st/2nd generation spoken word artist and arts educator born and rooted in the Bay Area. Her emergence into the spoken word world as a queer Samoan womyn and activist has granted her opportunities to perform on stages ranging from San Francisco’s historical Herbst Theatre to the White House. The most memorable moment in her career was receiving President Obama’s Champion of Change Award for her activism as a Pacific Islander spoken word artist and arts activist in her community. Off stage, she is a first-year graduate student working toward her master’s degree in Marriage/Family Therapy at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.”

womenpacific:

juliosalgado83:

I was lucky go catch Terisa Siagatonu throw it down with this beautiful poem on Saturday at Jean Melesaine’s Navigating Queer Waves show at Galería de la Raza I love how these badass poets of color are queerifying the world one poem at a time!

NOTE: This is only part of the poem. 

Terisa Tinei Siagatonu is a 1st/2nd generation spoken word artist and arts educator born and rooted in the Bay Area. Her emergence into the spoken word world as a queer Samoan womyn and activist has granted her opportunities to perform on stages ranging from San Francisco’s historical Herbst Theatre to the White House. The most memorable moment in her career was receiving President Obama’s Champion of Change Award for her activism as a Pacific Islander spoken word artist and arts activist in her community. Off stage, she is a first-year graduate student working toward her master’s degree in Marriage/Family Therapy at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.”